Albert Gallienne married Sophia Hamon – 1902

Sometimes, when researching the family tree, the saying: “There is no smoke without fire,” rings true and is worth listening to or bearing in mind.

My grandmother Grace, always believed her mother, Florence, was from Guernsey. Florence Gallienne died when Grace was 9 years old, so it is understandable that Grace knew very little about her own mother. Her father could have told her more except Grace was put in an orphanage along with one sister and one brother. Family stories do not get passed on in orphanages.

So when I did my research into the Gallienne side of my family I found out that in fact it was Grace’s grandfather, Albert Gallienne that was born in Guernsey and not her mother.

I confess, that this side of the family has been difficult to research and form a bigger tree. I know next to nothing about the Guernsey Galliennes and even less about the Jersey Hamons.

What I did find out with help from www.guernseyancestry.com a while back, was the following:

St. Pierre du Bois, Guernsey church where Albert was born on 25th January 1870

St. Pierre du Bois, Guernsey church where Albert was born on 25th January 1870

Marriage date: 30th March 1902

Albert Gallienne was 32 and a Mason, residing in St. Peter, Guernsey when he married Florence Sophia Hamon. Albert’s father was Alfred Gallienne.

Florence Sophia Hamon - circa 1960

Florence Sophia Hamon – circa 1960

Florence (b. 1884) was 18, residing in St. Luke’s when she married Albert. There is a 14 year age gap between Florence and her new husband Albert. Her father was Philip James Hamon (there are many many Philip Hamons in Jersey at this time, so this does not help much.)

These details are form the St. Luke’s Church Marriage Register (ref: 1873-1908 page 399)

The extra information written on a marriage record regarding the bride and grooms father’s is invaluable for making the next step further back in the tree.

This is the first record of evidence that Albert is no longer in Guernsey. The previous year, in 1901, Albert, aged 31, was living at La Planque, St. Pierre du Bois, Guernsey as a boarder in the household of  Elie Bree, a shopkeeper. As far as I know an Elias John Bree was godparent to Albert and Florence’s daughter’s baptism in 1906. This was the baptism of Florence Anna Gallienne, Grace’s mother.

I have no idea why Albert moved to Jersey, apart from fact that maybe there was more masonry work available in the larger island. I do know that he stayed and had four children with Florence: Albert Philip, Florence Anna, Henry and Philip James. I do not know where he died. It seems that Florence Hamon may have married again to a Mr. Michel but I have yet to confirm this.

I wonder how they met? Florence’s father was a news vendor at the time of the marriage. But what is interesting is that the Elias Bree (b. 1877) whom Albert was living with as a boarder in 1901, later is married to an Anna Evaline Hamon (b. 1875). Anna is Florence’s older sister. So maybe Elias visits Jersey with Albert where he meets Anna, who introduces Albert to Florence? It’s all speculation, but it’s all possible too.

 

Henry Rabet marries Florence Gallienne

Henry and Florence in 1933, nine years after their marriage.

On this day 23rd June 1924 my great grandparents Henry Yves Rabet and Florence Anna Gallienne were married in the Parish of St. Saviour, Jersey, Channel Islands.

  • Henry was 22 years old, a bachelor, living in St. Saviours (I don’t know where exactly). He was working as a Labourer, maybe with his father Yves Rabet, also a Labourer, who is on the marriage certificate.
  • Florence was 18 years old, a spinster, living in St. Andrew/St. Helier. Her father Albert Gallienne is on the certificate working as a mason.

Screenshot of marriage certificate.

Henry and Florence married in the presence of Peter Le Vannais and Hilda Maud le Vannais. Hilda is one of Henry’s sisters. How Henry and Florence met is unknown, and in the next six years they start a family and have four children together. My grandmother told my mother that she was brought up in a place called Paul Mill Cottage as seen in the photo below, in Mont de la Rosiere Lane.

Mont de la Rosiere – where Florence and Henry lived in the late 1920, early 1930’s.

 

Certificates are always an exciting purchase and in my eyes are always worth it for the extra details they record.

Eg:

  • professions of both fathers of the bride and groom
  • residence of bride and groom at time of marriage
  • witnesses at the marriage