Jean Lozouet – died 31st August 1833

On the 31st August, Jean Lozouet of the parish of Surville in Normandy, France died and was buried in the old section of St. Lawrence graveyard. I found out about this on the islandwiki.org website under the leter ‘L’ in St. Lawrence Burials: Lozuet

J Lozuet - 1833

Through some contact with the Parish of St. Lawrence I soon found out the following details from the incredibly helpful secretary who had spoken to the Sexton on my behalf and another family history expert.

 

‘… if there was not a family grave or there was no money and the Parish paid for the burial then some persons were buried in the pathways and no stones were or marking were placed on the plots,…’

The secretary also adds that this may not have been the case with Jean Lozouet but it is a possibilty worth knowing.

J Lozuet - death book

 

I do not know if or how Jean Lozouet is related to me yet, but I am almost certain he must be, as there were and still are very few Lozouets in Jersey. My next step would be to see a copy of his death certificate whcih may show extra details, such as date of birth/age at death/address/cause of death.

UPDATE: I have since been informed that civil registration  did not begin until 1842 in Jersey. Guernsey began theirs two years earlier in 1840 and the Uk even earlier in 1837. My friend and family historian also continues to tell me that this includes all births marriages and deaths. Thank you Helen! :-)

It may also be of interest to know that it has been a year since jersey suffered a Cholera epidemic in August 1832, maybe this was the cause?

You can read more about my Lozouet connections here: Family name – LOZUET

The furthest I have managed to get back is with my Jean Louis Desire Lozue, born circa 1840, 7 years after the other Jean Lozouet dies. Is it his grandfather? Is it a brother? Sometimes when children died young, the name of that child would be used again for a following sibling.

As my grandmother Clara Lozuet was one of five girls, the name Lozuet died out with her generation but I do know that there was a family of boys. So far I have not been able to establish a connection.

In the 1901 Census for St. Helier, Jersey, there is a Aimable Lozouet – French subject – single – aged 26 – a General Domestic Servant – possibly working at 9 Esplanade, Custom’s Hotel. My great grandmother Clara had this photo in her possessions when she died:

Screen Shot 2014-08-31 at 5.53.55 pm

I don’t know who this young boy is, he may not even be a Lozuet but he does have Hotel enbroided on his collar. Plus, he looks younger than 26 and would a Domestic servant wear a uniform? Questions, questions…

What I do know is that in 1901 Walter J Dovey was up and running as an Island photographer according to the two following links:

http://www.theislandwiki.org/index.php/List_of_photographers_in_Jersey_1840-1940

http://jerseyfamilyhistory.co.uk/?page_id=11

Ann Marcellaine Mahaut – born 10 January 1854

St. Lawrence Church - I wonder if this was where Ann was born?

St. Lawrence Church, Jersey, Channel Islands – I wonder if this was where Ann was born?

Ann Marcellaine (Marcelin) Mahaut was my great great great grandmother. I am amazed and delighted that I have been able to go back this far. Our DNA is practically the same. When I got my DNA test results for my MATERNAL LINEAGE’ it says our ancient ancestors (known as the Travelers) come from the maternal haplogroup U. According to wikipedia, the possible time of origin is 55.000 BP and possible place of origin is Western Asia. There are 8 subgroups in the U group and therefore I need to discover more about which of the 8 I may be in and therefore more specifically where my ancient ancestors come from.

As far as I know, Ann wasn’t from anywhere as far as Asia, for she was born in Jersey, Channel Islands.

Here is her timeline:

1854 – Ann Marcellaine Mahaut is the second  child born to Jean Aimable Mahaut (c. 1819) and Anne Henriette Quenault (c.1819). Place of birth was St. Lawrence, Jersey. She has an older sister Lydie born in 1843, nearly 11 years earlier.

1861 – In the Census of 1861, Ann is living at the Farm House, St. Lawrence with just her parents. Lydie had proably left home by now as she would have been 18 years old.

1870 – Opening of the railway from St. Helier to St. Aubins.

1871 – In the census a decade later, Ann  (17) is now living with her parents at the Bake House in Vingtaine of the Valley, St. Laurence. Her father is now a Sailor and her mother a Baker. Ann is now also a Baker and is obviously helping her mother. I wonder if it was their own business. I know there was an old bakehouse in St. Lawrence. Times have changed. During this year the Channel Islands Exhibition was held in Victoria College Grounds.

At some point in time Ann meets Philip James Hamon (he is 18 years older than her and this is possibly his second marriage). I have yet to discover the marriage date and details, although according to the website Family Treemaker, it states that she got married in 1875. Click on the following link to see details: Familytree maker

1875 – Ann gives birth to a daughter Anna Eveline Hamon with her husband Philip J. Hamon.

1877 – Ann and Philip have their second child, Philip James Hamon jr.

1879 – Ann and Philip have their 3rd chilld George Hamon.

1881 – Ann (27) and Philip have their 4th child Charles Hamon. The details at Charles’s baptism are as follows: father’s occupation – Mariner. Godparents – John Charles Quenault (maybe Ann’s relation) and Mary Ann Denise. Ann is now living  along St. Aubin’s Road.

1882 – Ann and Philip have their 5th child, Walter Hamon.

1883 – ON the 5th December, Ann and Philip have their 6th child, Florence Sophia Hamon (my great great grandmother). They are now all living at No.4 Newgate Street, St. Helier in town near the local prison, which would have had a very different environment to the countryside of St. Lawrence.

1891 – Ann (aged 37) is still living at 4 Newgate Street with her husband and children: Philip, George, Charles, Florence, Priscilla, Edith and a boarder Florence H. Le Gros. Her husband Philip is still a Seaman, while her son Philip is a Carpenter’s apprentice and the other children are scholars, apart from Edith who is too young for school aged 5.

1899 – On the 30th March 1899 the London and South Western steamer, the ‘Stella’ sank on it’s way to Guernsey and Jersey. It hit the rocks off Alderney’s coast and sank within 15 minutes. 86 passengers and 19 crew died.

1901 – Ann (47) has moved to No.5 Patriotic Place with her Husband Philip, now a news vendor at the age of 66. Her son Philip is no longer a Carpenter’s apprentice but a Sailor. Her son George is a Labourer at Saws Mill? (Hard to read). Florence and Edith are still at home too.

1911 – The final Census available at this current time states that Ann (57) is living with her husband Philip and they are both now working as News Vendors from home. Their son Philip (aged 34) is still living with them and is working as a Seaman still.

My research ends there as I have not been able to find out anymore. I do not know when Ann died or where she or her husband are buried. The Familytree maker website says she dies in Guernsey.

Researching my female ancestors is always a joy to me. I like to discover what their everyday lives might have been like and compare it to mine.

If you know more about Ann and her family I would love to hear from you.