Isaac William Davey – born 30 December 1851

I have been pleased with the amount of progress in my research on Isaac William Davey. His timeline is filled with many events. Some sad, some curious, some rather romantic. The only thing missing is a photo of him.

1851 – On the 30th December Isaac William Davey is born in St. Helier (possibly 143 Breton Yard, Jersey – which I think no longer exists). His parents were Isaac William Davey b.1821 and Ann ‘Nancy’ Le Breton b.1827.

1852 – Four months later, Isaac is baptised in St. Helier, Jersey. His godparents were Isaac Davey Senior (his father) and Fanny Le Breton, aged 15 (his aunty/mother’s sister).

I wonder why Isaac was baptised so late after his birth? Nowadays, baptising your child four months after their birth doesn’t seem such a long time but in the 1800’s it was recommended that a baby be baptised very soon after the birth due to illness and high child death rates. I know that when my son was baptised he was almost 9 months old. This was due to the fact that we did a joint baptism ceremony with his cousin Anna. In an article by Stuart Basten from the Cambridge Group for the History of Population and Social Structure, he explains:

…in the early seventeenth-century, William Gouge wrote that ‘it is not meet for Christians to defer the baptizing of their children beyond eight days.

He goes on to say that:

However, both Gouge and the later seventeenth-century Prayer Books allow for a short period of rest for mother and child.

1861 – Aged 10, Isaac is living at 14 Lempriere Street, St. Helier, Jersey with his father Isaac – a ships carpenter, mother Ann and siblings William, Ann, Mary and Esther – all scholars (attending school).

1871 – Aged 20, Isaac is still living at 14 Lempriere Street ( once known as The Eagle Tavern). He is now a shipwright following in his father’s footsteps. His mother Ann is a Tavern Keeper. I wonder if she living upstairs and working downstairs in The Eagle Tavern? Isaac’s six siblings are also living at home with him: William – a Mason’s Labourer, Ann E. – Apprentice Tailoress, Mary, Esther, Cecelia, Matilda and Selina.

You can read more about shipwrights in a previous post here: Shipwrights

1876 – At the age of 26 Isaac marries Ellenora Goudge. Tony, a family historian and contact of mine gave me the following romantic story;

Screen Shot 2014-12-30 at 11.27.32 am

The marriage date was first worked out from 1911 census. Then on a visit to the Jersey archives one year I found the following information from his marriage record book ALL SAINTS C/E MARRIAGE INDEX SEPT 1872-JUN 1907:

NO.22    January 4th 1876

Name: Isaac William Davey

Age: 24

Marital status: Bachelor

Occupation: Shipwright

Place of residence at time of marriage: St. Helier

Place of birth: St. Helier

Father: Isaac William Davey               Rank: Shipwright

***

Name: Ellen Goudge

Age: 21

Marital Status: Spinster

P.O.R at time of marriage: St. Helier

P.O.B: Grouville

Father: Henry Goudge                Rank: Mariner

En presence de: A. H. Moon & Mary Frances Davey (Mary is Isaac’s sister and Mr Moon later becomes Frances’s husband)

1877 – On the 1st of January Isaac and Ellenora become parents to son Isaac Davey.

1879 – On the 20th February Isaac and Ellenora give birth to James Davey.

1881 – Isaac is still living at 14 Lempriere Street, St. Helier, Jersey. this residence must be feeling quite cramped by now as Isaac is living here with his parents, 5 siblings, his wife and sons Isaac and James. That’s 11 people!

(Note: the mother Ellenora’s birth place on the 1881 census says St. Martin, not Grouville.) It is here that Isaac and Ellenora’s third child Elenora was born.

1885 – Isaac and Ellenora become parents to my great grandfather George Perchard Davey born at 14 Lempriere Street, St. Helier, Jersey.

1888 – On 15th August, Isaac and Ellenora have another daughter, Eva Louisa Davey. Eva was baptised within a month. maybe they knew she was not going to survive. Sadly, Eva died of convulsions 5 months later in the following January. During this period Isaac is working as a carpenter.

1891 – Isaac, aged 39 and Ellenora, aged 36, become parents to another son, William Davey, born at 14 Lempriere Street, St. Helier, Jersey. Isaac is now recorded as a ‘shipwright.’ His son Isaac is apprentice to a plasterer and his son James is an errand boy. Isaac’s parents and one sister are also still living at this address.

1893 – On the 12th may, Isaac and Ellenora have another daughter Violet May Davey.

1899 – The Channel Islands sees one of it’s worst shipwrecks in history. The sinking of the South Western Steamer, The Stella. You can read more about the disaster here in a previous post: The Stella. 86 passengers and 19 crew died. One of the crew was a W. Davey. As of yet I have been unable to confirm a link with my Davey tree. But what I do know is that family relations between Isaac and his father Isaac Senior deteriorate around this time. So much so that in Isaac seniors Will & Testament in October 1899, Isaac Snr states:

“…it is also my wish that my body shall not bee seen or touched by my eldest son Isaac William Davey after my death.-“

 These are quite dramatic and powerful words and one can only wonder at what on earth Isaac Jnr said or did to enrage the anger of his father so much. Did Isaac say something bad about W. Davey’s seamanship on the Stella?

Did Isaac reconcile with his father before he died 6 months later in July 1900?

1901 – Aged 50, Isaac is living at 15 Union Street with his wife Ellenora, son George P. Davey, a plasterer and daughter Violet M. Davey.

1911 – Aged 60, this years census states that Isaac is a ship-fitter, living with his wife Ellenora at 21 Charles Street, St. Helier, Jersey. The census also records that of the 8 children Isaac and ellenora have had, only 4 are alive in 1911. Also living at this address is Ellenora’s mother, Eleonore Hope Goudge (nee Perchard) a widow aged 81 along with grandson John Philip Bree, aged 25, single and a Baker.

Where Isaac William Davey died or was buried is still unknown to me, although I do know that his wife Ellenora is curiously in the same grave as Isaac’s father. Maybe Ellenora reconciled with her father-in-law at some point. Maybe she took sides? Whatever happened Isaac’s love for his wife was enduring as we can see from the photo image above where Isaac was calling for Ellenora on his deathbed.

I hope you have found this interesting, maybe have even discovered something new. And if there is anything new you can tell me or contribute to Isaac’s life I would to hear from you.

Thanks for stopping by!

Ramona

Some more information on the history of baptisms:

When were babies baptised? Some Welsh evidence

Birth baptism intervals for family historians

George Perchard Davey – born 26 April 1885

My great great grandfather was born 127 years ago today. He was the son of Isaac William Davey (b. 30 December 1851 – St. Helier, Jersey) and Ellenora Goudge (b. 1855 – Grouville, Jersey). George is the middle child of 6 children.

Here is his timeline that I have researched so far:

1885 – George Perchard Davey is born at 14 Lempriere Street, St. Helier, Jersey. Until about a year ago, 14 Lempriere Street was also known as  ‘The Eagle Tavern’.

1885 – On the 10th May, George is baptised in the parish of St. Helier. His father Isaac is recorded as a shipwright on the records. His godparents are a Perchard George (his mothers brother). We can presume this is where he gets his middle name from. The other godparent is Evaline Goudge. Ellenora’s sister/ George’s aunty.

1891 – George is 6 years old and is recorded in the census as a ‘scholar’. He is still living at 14 Lempriere Street, along with his parents and siblings: Older brother Isaac – apprentice to plasterer, James – Errand boy, Elenora – scholar. George’s grandparents Isaac William Davey and Ann ‘Nancy’ Le Breton and Aunty Cecelia are also living with them in this tiny home with a pub downstairs! That’s nine people.

1901 – In the next census, George is 16 years old and is living at 15 Union Street, St. Helier, Jersey with his parents and sister Violet. He is working as a ‘Plasterer’, maybe at the same place his brother Isaac was working for 10 years earlier.

1906 – On the 17th May, George marries Ada Margaret Barette, daughter of Frank Barette  – a Barrack Warden. They marry in the parish of St. Saviour, probably at St. Saviour’s Church. Ada was living at Grouville at the time. The marriage took place in the presence of I.W Davey & Eleanor Davey (George’s parents).

1911 – George (aged 26) and Ada (aged 25) have their first child: George Davey. They are living at 15 Winchester Street. Maria Chapman, a nurse, is also living with them. I think she may be a type of ‘night nurse’, there to help with the first few weeks of rearing the baby. This implies that George and Ada have a little spare money and must be comfortable financially.

1914 – George and Ada have another child on the 16th February: Lily Ethel Barette.

1914 – 1918 WORLD WAR 1 – During the war, George is positioned in Nottingham. His Rank: Sergeant of the Royal Engineers, Labour Corps

1917 – On the 19th May, Ada Margaret Barette, native of London,  is sentenced by the Royal Court and sent to prison for ‘6 months hard labour.’  Sadly, she is ‘charged with abandoning her four children’ I have to say I was rather gobsmacked when I first discovered this. And many questions still go unanswered. I do not know when her two other children were born or where any of the four children ended up. Is George still serving at war?

1919 – On the 19th May, George (aged 34) enlists in Jersey to serve overseas on active duty – Labour Corps. I still wonder where are the children?

1920 – On the 19th April, George is discharged from service due to ‘Demobilisation’. Character assessed as ‘Good’. Height: 5ft 51/2 – Complexion: fresh – Eyes & hair: brown – Scar on left side of cheek.

1921 King George V, Queen Mary and Princess Mary visited Jersey. Was George named after the King of his time?

1922 – On the 22nd of July, George buys a town house: 7 New Street, James Place, Jersey.

1924 – On the 6th May, George’s son is born (my grandfather): Kenneth George Davey. His mother is Clara Eliza Lozuet. What happened to Ada?

1925 – On the 14th July, aged 40, George writes his Will & Testament.

1938 – On the 28th February, George’s stepson (Clara’s son) dies of an electric shock in an accident at work. Read more about the tragedy here: Tragedy in 1938

1940 – On the 1st of July Jersey is under forced occupation by the German army. George is living at 29 Dorset Street with his wife Clara, son Kenneth and his wife to be Lorna Patch.

1941 – On the 14th July George (aged 56) had to go on ‘Guard Duty’ in Rouge Boullion from 10pm to 2am. He had to report at the Town hall. Locals had been painting ‘V’ for victory signs on German posters, etc. Very near the street to where George lived!

1942 – On the 16th May, George had his possessions insured – a dwelling, Piano, wireless set, etc. with the Jersey Mutual Fire Insurance Society. Wireless sets were confiscated at some time during the German Occupation.

1945 – After five years under German occupation, Jersey is liberated!

1947 – On the 1st October, George (aged 62) dies of a heart attack while ironing upstairs. George is buried in Mont-a-L’Abbe Cemetery on the 6th October, Jersey, UK. The J.E.P. states his age as 64.

It remains a mystery to this day what happened to George and Ada’s four children. Ada stayed in the island after her sentence. The only reason I know this, is because I have seen her Identity cards that all islanders had to have during the German Occupation in the World War 2. I do not know if she tried to get back in contact with her children. As a mother myself, I hope so. Or did she stay in the island just so she could watch them grow up from afar? I would love a reader to answer these questions for me…