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Ann Elizabeth Davey – born 24th June 1854

On this day, the 24th June 1854 my 2nd great grand aunt  Ann Elizabeth Davey was born. She was the 4th out of ten children born to Ann ‘Nancy’ Le Breton and Isaac William Davey. I get great satisfaction in writing about my female ancestors. They can disappear very quickly in history and in the records, especially once they lose their maiden name and become married.

Here is Ann’s timeline from what I know so far:

1854 – On the 24th June, Ann is born in St. Helier, Jersey. the first daughter for Ann Nancy Le Breton and Isaac William Davey.

1854 – On the 3rd September Ann is baptised in the Parish of St. Helier (source: http://search.jerseyheritage.org/wwwopacx/wwwopac.ashx?command=getcontent&server=files&value=%5CGC03A215.pdf)

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1861 – In the 7th April 1861 the Channel Isalnd Census was taken. At the age of 6 Ann is recorded as a ‘scholar.’ She is living at 14 Lempriere Street with her mother, father, older brother’s Isaac and William and younger sisters Mary and Ester.

1871 – Ann is 17 and is working as an Apprentice Tailoress. This could be a tough job in cramped conditions working long hours.

“Dressmaking was an essential service in Victorian Britain, no community could really be without a dressmaker, and those who were trained and skilled had a job for life. “

(Quote from Amanda Wilkinson: D is for Dressmaker -http://19thcenturyhistorian.wordpress.com/2013/12/12/d-is-for-dressmaker/)

1881 – Ann is now called Ann E. Blackmore. She has married Henry Blackmore although he is not in the household on the day this Census is taken. Ann, aged 26 is living in Dorset Street (possibly No. 13). She is sister-in-law to the head of the household Jas Blackmore (her husband’s brother), a Seaman. Ann is still working as a Tailoress. Also in the household are Jas’s sister Mary Messervy, a Dressmaker, aged 26. Jas’s other sister Emma Blackmore, aged 18 also a Dressmaker and Maud M. Messervy, aged 3, a niece (probaly Mary’s daughter. Interestingly, the neice Maud was born in Sydney, New South Wales!

I wonder why mary and Maud are back in the island? I wonder why Mary went to Australia, had a daughter theere and how did she had enough money to travel back?

I currently can’t find Henry Blackmore’s whereabouts on the day of the census but will update this page should I find out.

1891 – Ann is now lodging at Duhamel Place with her 5 children:  Henry, aged, a scholar/ Ann E., aged 7, a scholar/ Alfred, aged 5/ William, aged 4 and Arthur S. aged 1.  Ann is still working as a Tailoress. The head of household is a William Nudd and his wife Cecelia, aged 39 and a Dressmaker. (This is possibly her sister Cecilia, although she should be younger not older???)

In the household are two other lodgers: Mary Whelan, aged 64, a Charwoman and Ellen Whelan, aged 59, a Dressmaker.

Local news:

On the 30th March 1899 the London and South Western steamer, the ‘Stella’ sank on it’s way to Guernsey and Jersey. It hit the rocks off Alderney’s coast and sank within 15 minutes. 86 passengers and 19 crew died. The Wreck of the Stella – Titanic of the Channel Islands Among the drowned was a W. Davey, I have yet to confirm whether or not he is a relation. He was the son of Capt. Davey of the brig ‘Union’. Were any of your ancestors among the dead?1901 – On the 31 march, the Census is taken and Annie is 47 years old,  a ‘widow’ working as a Tailoress of her ‘own account’. She is living with her children: Anne E. (16) – dressmaker, William (12) and Arthur S. (11).

I don’t know anymore beyond this date. I can’t find Ann in the 1911 Census. Although many women were not in the 1911 Census due to ‘suffragette’ tendencies. Did Ann object to have her name in the census? Maybe you can help me?

Thanks for stopping by! :-)

 

Census Dates

Screenshot of my Davey ancestors Isaac W. Davey and his wife Ann (nee le Breton) and their 7 children living at 14 Lempriere Street (AKA The Eagle Tavern)

One of the most useful sources of information when I am researching my Channel Island Ancestry is the  population census taken every ten years. What we don’t always know is the exact date that the census was taken on.

UK CENSUS DATES

Here is a website which gives you the date of the UK Census dates: UK Census dates.

JERSEY CENSUS DATES

1891 Channel Island Census – 5th April 1891

GUERNSEY CENSUS DATES

1901 Census – St. Peter Port, Guernsey – 31 March 1901

Useful information found in Census records:

  • Name of head of household
  • occupants of household
  • address
  • occupants age – occupation/living means – marriage status/school attendee – years married – nationality of occupants (and father’s nationality)
  • who their neighbours are (they could be more relations!)

Here are some interesting Census records for you to browse:

1841 Census Channel Islands

1881 Census: Residents of Jersey General Hospital (Also known as The Workhouse at the time – information includes: inmates, nurses, cooks, boarders, domestic servants and so on.)

Note: I will update this post if I come across the further dates for when the Jersey census was taken every ten years.

George Perchard Davey – born 26 April 1885

My great great grandfather was born 127 years ago today. He was the son of Isaac William Davey (b. 30 December 1851 – St. Helier, Jersey) and Ellenora Goudge (b. 1855 – Grouville, Jersey). George is the middle child of 6 children.

Here is his timeline that I have researched so far:

1885 – George Perchard Davey is born at 14 Lempriere Street, St. Helier, Jersey. Until about a year ago, 14 Lempriere Street was also known as  ‘The Eagle Tavern’.

1885 - On the 10th May, George is baptised in the parish of St. Helier. His father Isaac is recorded as a shipwright on the records. His godparents are a Perchard George (his mothers brother). We can presume this is where he gets his middle name from. The other godparent is Evaline Goudge. Ellenora’s sister/ George’s aunty.

1891 – George is 6 years old and is recorded in the census as a ‘scholar’. He is still living at 14 Lempriere Street, along with his parents and siblings: Older brother Isaac – apprentice to plasterer, James – Errand boy, Elenora – scholar. George’s grandparents Isaac William Davey and Ann ‘Nancy’ Le Breton and Aunty Cecelia are also living with them in this tiny home with a pub downstairs! That’s nine people.

1901 – In the next census, George is 16 years old and is living at 15 Union Street, St. Helier, Jersey with his parents and sister Violet. He is working as a ‘Plasterer’, maybe at the same place his brother Isaac was working for 10 years earlier.

1906 – On the 17th May, George marries Ada Margaret Barette, daughter of Frank Barette  – a Barrack Warden. They marry in the parish of St. Saviour, probably at St. Saviour’s Church. Ada was living at Grouville at the time. The marriage took place in the presence of I.W Davey & Eleanor Davey (George’s parents).

1911 – George (aged 26) and Ada (aged 25) have their first child: George Davey. They are living at 15 Winchester Street. Maria Chapman, a nurse, is also living with them. I think she may be a type of ‘night nurse’, there to help with the first few weeks of rearing the baby. This implies that George and Ada have a little spare money and must be comfortable financially.

1914 – George and Ada have another child on the 16th February: Lily Ethel Barette.

1914 – 1918 WORLD WAR 1 – During the war, George is positioned in Nottingham. His Rank: Sergeant of the Royal Engineers, Labour Corps

1917 – On the 19th May, Ada Margaret Barette, native of London,  is sentenced by the Royal Court and sent to prison for ‘6 months hard labour.’  Sadly, she is ‘charged with abandoning her four children’ I have to say I was rather gobsmacked when I first discovered this. And many questions still go unanswered. I do not know when her two other children were born or where any of the four children ended up. Is George still serving at war?

1919 – On the 19th May, George (aged 34) enlists in Jersey to serve overseas on active duty – Labour Corps. I still wonder where are the children?

1920 – On the 19th April, George is discharged from service due to ‘Demobilisation’. Character assessed as ‘Good’. Height: 5ft 51/2 – Complexion: fresh – Eyes & hair: brown – Scar on left side of cheek.

1921 King George V, Queen Mary and Princess Mary visited Jersey. Was George named after the King of his time?

1922 – On the 22nd of July, George buys a town house: 7 New Street, James Place, Jersey.

1924 – On the 6th May, George’s son is born (my grandfather): Kenneth George Davey. His mother is Clara Eliza Lozuet. What happened to Ada?

1925 – On the 14th July, aged 40, George writes his Will & Testament.

1938 – On the 28th February, George’s stepson (Clara’s son) dies of an electric shock in an accident at work. Read more about the tragedy here: Tragedy in 1938

1940 – On the 1st of July Jersey is under forced occupation by the German army. George is living at 29 Dorset Street with his wife Clara, son Kenneth and his wife to be Lorna Patch.

1941 – On the 14th July George (aged 56) had to go on ‘Guard Duty’ in Rouge Boullion from 10pm to 2am. He had to report at the Town hall. Locals had been painting ‘V’ for victory signs on German posters, etc. Very near the street to where George lived!

1942 – On the 16th May, George had his possessions insured – a dwelling, Piano, wireless set, etc. with the Jersey Mutual Fire Insurance Society. Wireless sets were confiscated at some time during the German Occupation.

1945 – After five years under German occupation, Jersey is liberated!

1947 – On the 1st October, George (aged 62) dies of a heart attack while ironing upstairs. George is buried in Mont-a-L’Abbe Cemetery on the 6th October, Jersey, UK. The J.E.P. states his age as 64.

It remains a mystery to this day what happened to George and Ada’s four children. Ada stayed in the island after her sentence. The only reason I know this, is because I have seen her Identity cards that all islanders had to have during the German Occupation in the World War 2. I do not know if she tried to get back in contact with her children. As a mother myself, I hope so. Or did she stay in the island just so she could watch them grow up from afar? I would love a reader to answer these questions for me…

Isaac William Davey marries Ann Le Breton

One hundred and sixty one years ago today, on the 27th November 1850 Isaac William Davey married Ann ‘Nancy’ Le Breton in the Parish of St. Helier.

Isaac – age 28 – Bachelor – Shipwright – POB: St. Helier – father: William Davey (a Carter)

Ann – age 24 – Spinster – no job – POB: St. Saviours – father: Philip Le Breton (a Thatcher)

The witnesses to this marriage were Charles Le Breton ( who I think is one of Ann’s 11 siblings) and Maria Payne (connection unknown).

Marriage certificates are a wealth of information, some of which will confirm many details you have already discovered which is always a great feeling. The certificate confirms or informs me for the first time who Isaac’s father is. This then gives me another name one more generation further back!

Other information will only lead to more confusion. In my other records of Ann I have her birth place as St. Clements. (Maybe she lived on the border of the two parishes).

I do not know which church they married in. I do know that St. Simon’s and St. Saviours church were both popular with the Davey family.

In the next year Isaac and Ann are living together in Breton Yard. I have not been able to find this location, although I have found a Breton Lane near the Archives. They have their first child, Isaac William Davey on 30th December 1851.  They are together for another 40 years and have 9 children.

I get the impression they were quite a strong couple. They lived together above the Eagle Tavern with her children and at times their grandchildren too! I am almost sure Ann worked in the Eagle Tavern for quite a while as she was at one time a Tavern Keeper aged 44. I do not know when Ann died or where (these are on my list of things to find out).

In October 1899, nine months before he dies, Isaac writes his last will where he states that he wishes to be ‘interred in Almorah Cemetery’ where his ‘beloved wife now lies’.  Fond words to the very end.

British subjects are evacuated from Jersey to Germany

Sixty nine years ago today, on the 16th September 1942, many Jersey residents were evacuated and transferred to Germany. Last year I discovered that one of my relations was ‘Transported to Germany on 16. 9.42′. (source: Identity card). Violet May Davey was an older sister to my great grandfather George Davey. She was 49 years old when she was transported with her son and husband.

Violet Bryant (nee Davey)

At first I was a bit confused as to why she was transported there. I still don’t have the exact answer, but one theory is that she went because her husband Wilroy Joseph Bryant was English, and not Jersey. This made quite a difference during the 2nd World War. Wilroy’s and Violet’s oldest son went with them, he was 20 years old. There is a photo of him standing in a group of men  in the prisoner-of-war camp ‘Laufen’ (the photo is in the Jersey archives). There was a younger son who would have been 10 years old at the time, but I don’t know if he went with them as well. As you will see in the notice below, only men of the age 16 to 70 had to go. Maybe he was left behind with other family members. Below is an extract from the evening post on the 16th September 1942:

Notice put in The Evening Post on the 16th September 1942

Laufen was a castle in Germany that was initially used as a prisoner-of-war camp during the war. Then in 1942 it was reused as an internment for hundreds of men deported from Jersey and Guernsey in the Channel Islands, as well as some American civilians. It was an incredibly brave decision to go, although there really wasn’t much choice in the matter. Her husband and son had to leave. They were going into the unknown and leaving family and friends behind and noone knew for how long for.

What happened to Violet and her family after the war? At Christmas I went home to Jersey to visit family and do some more research on my family tree. On a visit to the archives there was a display of children’s family trees for a project at one of the islands secondary schools. I recognised one of the names on the tree. I had taught this young lady when she was 5 years old and to my amazement Violet Davey was on her tree! Violet was her great, great grandmother, who had survived the war.

Note: The Evening Post was founded in 1890. Now known as the Jersey Evening Post or J.E.P.

“From 1940 to 1945, the Channel Islands were occupied by the German armed forces, and although publication of the paper continued, it was produced under the supervision and strict censorship of the occupying forces”

(Source: http://www.thisisjersey.com/jersey-evening-post/history-of-the-jep/)