Isaac William Davey – born 30 December 1851

I have been pleased with the amount of progress in my research on Isaac William Davey. His timeline is filled with many events. Some sad, some curious, some rather romantic. The only thing missing is a photo of him.

1851 – On the 30th December Isaac William Davey is born in St. Helier (possibly 143 Breton Yard, Jersey – which I think no longer exists). His parents were Isaac William Davey b.1821 and Ann ‘Nancy’ Le Breton b.1827.

1852 – Four months later, Isaac is baptised in St. Helier, Jersey. His godparents were Isaac Davey Senior (his father) and Fanny Le Breton, aged 15 (his aunty/mother’s sister).

I wonder why Isaac was baptised so late after his birth? Nowadays, baptising your child four months after their birth doesn’t seem such a long time but in the 1800’s it was recommended that a baby be baptised very soon after the birth due to illness and high child death rates. I know that when my son was baptised he was almost 9 months old. This was due to the fact that we did a joint baptism ceremony with his cousin Anna. In an article by Stuart Basten from the Cambridge Group for the History of Population and Social Structure, he explains:

…in the early seventeenth-century, William Gouge wrote that ‘it is not meet for Christians to defer the baptizing of their children beyond eight days.

He goes on to say that:

However, both Gouge and the later seventeenth-century Prayer Books allow for a short period of rest for mother and child.

1861 – Aged 10, Isaac is living at 14 Lempriere Street, St. Helier, Jersey with his father Isaac – a ships carpenter, mother Ann and siblings William, Ann, Mary and Esther – all scholars (attending school).

1871 – Aged 20, Isaac is still living at 14 Lempriere Street ( once known as The Eagle Tavern). He is now a shipwright following in his father’s footsteps. His mother Ann is a Tavern Keeper. I wonder if she living upstairs and working downstairs in The Eagle Tavern? Isaac’s six siblings are also living at home with him: William – a Mason’s Labourer, Ann E. – Apprentice Tailoress, Mary, Esther, Cecelia, Matilda and Selina.

You can read more about shipwrights in a previous post here: Shipwrights

1876 – At the age of 26 Isaac marries Ellenora Goudge. Tony, a family historian and contact of mine gave me the following romantic story;

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The marriage date was first worked out from 1911 census. Then on a visit to the Jersey archives one year I found the following information from his marriage record book ALL SAINTS C/E MARRIAGE INDEX SEPT 1872-JUN 1907:

NO.22    January 4th 1876

Name: Isaac William Davey

Age: 24

Marital status: Bachelor

Occupation: Shipwright

Place of residence at time of marriage: St. Helier

Place of birth: St. Helier

Father: Isaac William Davey               Rank: Shipwright

***

Name: Ellen Goudge

Age: 21

Marital Status: Spinster

P.O.R at time of marriage: St. Helier

P.O.B: Grouville

Father: Henry Goudge                Rank: Mariner

En presence de: A. H. Moon & Mary Frances Davey (Mary is Isaac’s sister and Mr Moon later becomes Frances’s husband)

1877 – On the 1st of January Isaac and Ellenora become parents to son Isaac Davey.

1879 – On the 20th February Isaac and Ellenora give birth to James Davey.

1881 – Isaac is still living at 14 Lempriere Street, St. Helier, Jersey. this residence must be feeling quite cramped by now as Isaac is living here with his parents, 5 siblings, his wife and sons Isaac and James. That’s 11 people!

(Note: the mother Ellenora’s birth place on the 1881 census says St. Martin, not Grouville.) It is here that Isaac and Ellenora’s third child Elenora was born.

1885 – Isaac and Ellenora become parents to my great grandfather George Perchard Davey born at 14 Lempriere Street, St. Helier, Jersey.

1888 – On 15th August, Isaac and Ellenora have another daughter, Eva Louisa Davey. Eva was baptised within a month. maybe they knew she was not going to survive. Sadly, Eva died of convulsions 5 months later in the following January. During this period Isaac is working as a carpenter.

1891 – Isaac, aged 39 and Ellenora, aged 36, become parents to another son, William Davey, born at 14 Lempriere Street, St. Helier, Jersey. Isaac is now recorded as a ‘shipwright.’ His son Isaac is apprentice to a plasterer and his son James is an errand boy. Isaac’s parents and one sister are also still living at this address.

1893 – On the 12th may, Isaac and Ellenora have another daughter Violet May Davey.

1899 – The Channel Islands sees one of it’s worst shipwrecks in history. The sinking of the South Western Steamer, The Stella. You can read more about the disaster here in a previous post: The Stella. 86 passengers and 19 crew died. One of the crew was a W. Davey. As of yet I have been unable to confirm a link with my Davey tree. But what I do know is that family relations between Isaac and his father Isaac Senior deteriorate around this time. So much so that in Isaac seniors Will & Testament in October 1899, Isaac Snr states:

“…it is also my wish that my body shall not bee seen or touched by my eldest son Isaac William Davey after my death.-“

 These are quite dramatic and powerful words and one can only wonder at what on earth Isaac Jnr said or did to enrage the anger of his father so much. Did Isaac say something bad about W. Davey’s seamanship on the Stella?

Did Isaac reconcile with his father before he died 6 months later in July 1900?

1901 – Aged 50, Isaac is living at 15 Union Street with his wife Ellenora, son George P. Davey, a plasterer and daughter Violet M. Davey.

1911 – Aged 60, this years census states that Isaac is a ship-fitter, living with his wife Ellenora at 21 Charles Street, St. Helier, Jersey. The census also records that of the 8 children Isaac and ellenora have had, only 4 are alive in 1911. Also living at this address is Ellenora’s mother, Eleonore Hope Goudge (nee Perchard) a widow aged 81 along with grandson John Philip Bree, aged 25, single and a Baker.

Where Isaac William Davey died or was buried is still unknown to me, although I do know that his wife Ellenora is curiously in the same grave as Isaac’s father. Maybe Ellenora reconciled with her father-in-law at some point. Maybe she took sides? Whatever happened Isaac’s love for his wife was enduring as we can see from the photo image above where Isaac was calling for Ellenora on his deathbed.

I hope you have found this interesting, maybe have even discovered something new. And if there is anything new you can tell me or contribute to Isaac’s life I would to hear from you.

Thanks for stopping by!

Ramona

Some more information on the history of baptisms:

When were babies baptised? Some Welsh evidence

Birth baptism intervals for family historians

Isaac William Davey marries Ann Le Breton

Originally posted on My Channel Island Ancestry:

One hundred and sixty one years ago today, on the 27th November 1850 Isaac William Davey married Ann ‘Nancy’ Le Breton in the Parish of St. Helier.

Isaac – age 28 – Bachelor – Shipwright – POB: St. Helier – father: William Davey (a Carter)

Ann – age 24 – Spinster – no job – POB: St. Saviours – father: Philip Le Breton (a Thatcher)

The witnesses to this marriage were Charles Le Breton ( who I think is one of Ann’s 11 siblings) and Maria Payne (connection unknown).

Marriage certificates are a wealth of information, some of which will confirm many details you have already discovered which is always a great feeling. The certificate confirms or informs me for the first time who Isaac’s father is. This then gives me another name one more generation further back!

Other information will only lead to more confusion. In my other records…

View original 208 more words

Jean Lozouet – died 31st August 1833

On the 31st August, Jean Lozouet of the parish of Surville in Normandy, France died and was buried in the old section of St. Lawrence graveyard. I found out about this on the islandwiki.org website under the leter ‘L’ in St. Lawrence Burials: Lozuet

J Lozuet - 1833

Through some contact with the Parish of St. Lawrence I soon found out the following details from the incredibly helpful secretary who had spoken to the Sexton on my behalf and another family history expert.

 

‘… if there was not a family grave or there was no money and the Parish paid for the burial then some persons were buried in the pathways and no stones were or marking were placed on the plots,…’

The secretary also adds that this may not have been the case with Jean Lozouet but it is a possibilty worth knowing.

J Lozuet - death book

 

I do not know if or how Jean Lozouet is related to me yet, but I am almost certain he must be, as there were and still are very few Lozouets in Jersey. My next step would be to see a copy of his death certificate whcih may show extra details, such as date of birth/age at death/address/cause of death.

UPDATE: I have since been informed that civil registration  did not begin until 1842 in Jersey. Guernsey began theirs two years earlier in 1840 and the Uk even earlier in 1837. My friend and family historian also continues to tell me that this includes all births marriages and deaths. Thank you Helen! :-)

It may also be of interest to know that it has been a year since jersey suffered a Cholera epidemic in August 1832, maybe this was the cause?

You can read more about my Lozouet connections here: Family name – LOZUET

The furthest I have managed to get back is with my Jean Louis Desire Lozue, born circa 1840, 7 years after the other Jean Lozouet dies. Is it his grandfather? Is it a brother? Sometimes when children died young, the name of that child would be used again for a following sibling.

As my grandmother Clara Lozuet was one of five girls, the name Lozuet died out with her generation but I do know that there was a family of boys. So far I have not been able to establish a connection.

In the 1901 Census for St. Helier, Jersey, there is a Aimable Lozouet – French subject – single – aged 26 – a General Domestic Servant – possibly working at 9 Esplanade, Custom’s Hotel. My great grandmother Clara had this photo in her possessions when she died:

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I don’t know who this young boy is, he may not even be a Lozuet but he does have Hotel enbroided on his collar. Plus, he looks younger than 26 and would a Domestic servant wear a uniform? Questions, questions…

What I do know is that in 1901 Walter J Dovey was up and running as an Island photographer according to the two following links:

http://www.theislandwiki.org/index.php/List_of_photographers_in_Jersey_1840-1940

http://jerseyfamilyhistory.co.uk/?page_id=11

snap shot of William Davey's Will - 1832

Cholera Epidemic reaches Jersey – 1832

On August 6th in 1832, the cholera epidemic that had been sweeping through England and Europe had finally reached the shores of Jersey.

Cholera = an acute intestinal infection characterized by severe diarrhoea, cramp, etc.: caused by ingestion of water or food contaminated with the bacterium. (The Collins Concise Dictionary)

Go back through the death dates of some of your ancestors. You may find you have people in your family tree that died around this time and cholera may have been the reason of death.

Alex Glendinning writes about the Jersey epidemic here: JERSEY CHOLERA EPIDEMIC – 1832

The epidemic spread throughout the town areas first as it was high residential area and therefore spread from building to building quicker than it did in the countryside. Alex writes that…

‘When the cholera reached Jersey on August 6 1832, there had been a heavy downpour of rain the previous day and Dr Hooper theorised that the movement of all the accumulated filth in the streams helped spread the disease.
Hilgrove Lane was one of the first places to suffer outbreaks.’

The majority of my ancestors were town dwellers, so this is of interest to me. Although I have not been able to always find specific addresses for this time as it was before the first Census in 1841.

I scan through all my family trees for all the death dates during this year and only find a date match with my Davey family.

The Rabet’s didn’t arrive in Jersey from Brittany until the turn of the century in the early 1900’s.

The Lozuet’s were living in St. Ouen at this time so were relatively safe (I presume).

I find William Davey who had died on the 19th November 1832. I have written about him before:

Boxing Day marriage of Mary De France & William Davey – 1804

William Davy – died 19th November 1832

William writes his Will & Testament four days before he dies in St. helier, leaving his wife Mary Defrance as executor and his children are his heirs: Thomas, Rachel, William, Isaac, Mary Ann and George. Unfortunately his Will does not state his address unlike his son Isaac’s Will & Testament 60 years later.

snap shot of William Davey's Will - 1832

It says that he is ‘of sound and disposing mind.’ I don’t have a copy of this death certificate, so I can not confirm  whether he was ill from cholera.  He died at the age of 52.

Alex Glendinning  goes on to state that:

According to Dr Hooper’s carefully kept statistics, 803 people were taken ill and 347 died over an eleven week and five day period. The deaths were so concentrated in the poorer parts of town, that the Rector of St Helier had to inaugurate a new Strangers’ Cemetery (below Westmount) on August 27 to cope with the extra burials. On October 27, the Board of Health reported the Island free of cholera and adjourned, the very day that the first case was reported in Guernsey.

Sadly, another cholera epidemic returns 16 years later, in 1848. You can read more about it in an article in the Jersey Evening Post: Containing Cholera In The 19th Century.

My next step is to get hold of a copy of William’s death certificate from the Jersey Registry Office to confirm details of his death.

I may have had more ancestors that fell ill or died from the cholera in 1832, but I do not know many of their dates of death. This is especially the case with my female ancestors. If I do not know the surname of the man they married I cannot trace their whereabouts and therefore when they died or where.

Have you found a family death during 1832?

George Davey bought 7 New Street

On the 22nd July 1922, at the age of 37,  my great grandfather George Perchard Davey appeared before the court and signed the deeds to a new house: 7 New Street, James Place, Jersey, Channel Islands.

Screen Shot 2014-07-22 at 11.57.31 am

The deed tells us so much:

  • who George is – son of Isaac William
  • who the house was bought/leased from – Mr. Arthur Schofield
  • exterior details – gables, facades and walls
  • the surrounding area – ‘…right to the well which is situated in the said street…’ ‘…by the East the school known as St. James’s Girls School…’

If only it was written in plain English because legal talk can be quite hard to understand (for me anyway). here is a little information about the costs:

Screen Shot 2014-07-22 at 12.06.25 pm

 

My grandfather Kenneth was born at this address. By 1940, George has moved and is living in Dorset Street.

I’m not too sure the house still exists. although the street is still there as you can see in the photo below.

screenshot from Google mpas

screenshot from Google maps

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Ann Elizabeth Davey – born 24th June 1854

On this day, the 24th June 1854 my 2nd great grand aunt  Ann Elizabeth Davey was born. She was the 4th out of ten children born to Ann ‘Nancy’ Le Breton and Isaac William Davey. I get great satisfaction in writing about my female ancestors. They can disappear very quickly in history and in the records, especially once they lose their maiden name and become married.

Here is Ann’s timeline from what I know so far:

1854 – On the 24th June, Ann is born in St. Helier, Jersey. the first daughter for Ann Nancy Le Breton and Isaac William Davey.

1854 – On the 3rd September Ann is baptised in the Parish of St. Helier (source: http://search.jerseyheritage.org/wwwopacx/wwwopac.ashx?command=getcontent&server=files&value=%5CGC03A215.pdf)

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1861 – In the 7th April 1861 the Channel Isalnd Census was taken. At the age of 6 Ann is recorded as a ‘scholar.’ She is living at 14 Lempriere Street with her mother, father, older brother’s Isaac and William and younger sisters Mary and Ester.

1871 – Ann is 17 and is working as an Apprentice Tailoress. This could be a tough job in cramped conditions working long hours.

“Dressmaking was an essential service in Victorian Britain, no community could really be without a dressmaker, and those who were trained and skilled had a job for life. “

(Quote from Amanda Wilkinson: D is for Dressmaker -http://19thcenturyhistorian.wordpress.com/2013/12/12/d-is-for-dressmaker/)

1881 – Ann is now called Ann E. Blackmore. She has married Henry Blackmore although he is not in the household on the day this Census is taken. Ann, aged 26 is living in Dorset Street (possibly No. 13). She is sister-in-law to the head of the household Jas Blackmore (her husband’s brother), a Seaman. Ann is still working as a Tailoress. Also in the household are Jas’s sister Mary Messervy, a Dressmaker, aged 26. Jas’s other sister Emma Blackmore, aged 18 also a Dressmaker and Maud M. Messervy, aged 3, a niece (probaly Mary’s daughter. Interestingly, the neice Maud was born in Sydney, New South Wales!

I wonder why mary and Maud are back in the island? I wonder why Mary went to Australia, had a daughter theere and how did she had enough money to travel back?

I currently can’t find Henry Blackmore’s whereabouts on the day of the census but will update this page should I find out.

1891 – Ann is now lodging at Duhamel Place with her 5 children:  Henry, aged, a scholar/ Ann E., aged 7, a scholar/ Alfred, aged 5/ William, aged 4 and Arthur S. aged 1.  Ann is still working as a Tailoress. The head of household is a William Nudd and his wife Cecelia, aged 39 and a Dressmaker. (This is possibly her sister Cecilia, although she should be younger not older???)

In the household are two other lodgers: Mary Whelan, aged 64, a Charwoman and Ellen Whelan, aged 59, a Dressmaker.

Local news:

On the 30th March 1899 the London and South Western steamer, the ‘Stella’ sank on it’s way to Guernsey and Jersey. It hit the rocks off Alderney’s coast and sank within 15 minutes. 86 passengers and 19 crew died. The Wreck of the Stella – Titanic of the Channel Islands Among the drowned was a W. Davey, I have yet to confirm whether or not he is a relation. He was the son of Capt. Davey of the brig ‘Union’. Were any of your ancestors among the dead?1901 – On the 31 march, the Census is taken and Annie is 47 years old,  a ‘widow’ working as a Tailoress of her ‘own account’. She is living with her children: Anne E. (16) – dressmaker, William (12) and Arthur S. (11).

I don’t know anymore beyond this date. I can’t find Ann in the 1911 Census. Although many women were not in the 1911 Census due to ‘suffragette’ tendencies. Did Ann object to have her name in the census? Maybe you can help me?

Thanks for stopping by! :-)